japan and brazil through a traveler’s eye

japan and brazil through a traveler’s eye

( About japan and brazil through a traveler’s eye ):-

George Mikes is a Hungarian painter, writer, publisher, illustrator, and journalist. These quotes are taken from ‘The Land of the rising Yen’ and ‘How the Tango’. Here he writes about his traveling experiences from two different parts of the world, Japan and Brazil.

Travel writing is about writing personal information for travel and visiting unfamiliar places. Tourism writing has become very popular as more and more people have started exploring new places in the world. Although much of the world has been studied, and almost everything has been written about it, the popularity of tourism writing is still growing. There are special travel channels and the influence of new media has increased its popularity. Travel stories tell us how culture is represented by another.

( Japan and brazil through a traveler’s eye )

Japanese Manner / Courtesy – substitute privacy

The author notes that the Japanese are a moral people. They respect each other’s privacy very much. Respect has a dual function there: respect and replace privacy. They make their business a very private business transaction, their love – a public argument in a private place.

Bowing

Everyone in Japan keeps bowing down to everyone. It’s mania. Bowing is unusual; more formal, eastern, and contagious as well. The Japanese have a complex bow: who bows to whom, how deep, and how long. Although it is complicated for us, they treat you without effort. Even the slightest difference in level, shape, age or social status will be subtly seen in that moment of separation. The wife bowed down to her husband, the child bowed down to her father, the younger ones to her older brothers, and the younger sister bowed down to her brothers. The author notes that despite their distinct habits, the Japanese can become cunning as soon as the bus arrives.

Eating Soup

One has to make a terrible noise when eating soup in Japan because it is a sign of appreciation. It should be in line with the expected standards of acceptance or consideration as an example of bad habits.

Brazilians and their sense of beauty / ( Traffic in Brazil )

Brazilian life seems to be moving slowly for the author. He appreciates their sense of beauty in decorating the gray streets of Copacabana with beautiful black paintings. But the free actors are quick to go crazy when they get to the steering wheel. They are passionate about cars, even though cars are very expensive. As soon as the driver notices a pedestrian step off the tarmac, he points it out and speeds up with a fair game. A pedestrian must flee in order to save his life. Driver and pedestrian – hunter and carnivore. They smile peacefully and move on. Even though the fight between the drivers is deadly but in good spirits. No anger, no hostility, no madness.

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FAQ

( japan and brazil through a traveler’s eye )

1. Why is bowing in Japan a complicated process?

The present world in which we live is a global phenomenon, thanks to advances in science and technology. People want to travel and find different cultures than ever before. Certain customs and traditions of the country are different and to an outsider from a variety of cultural backgrounds that seem strange and often complex. We see similar events in “Japan and Brazil with the Eye of the Move”. George Mike on his visit to Japan finds something unusual and orderly. However, Japanese bowing is a natural ritual in their culture.

He says it is so contagious that after a few hours we also start bowing. To the author everything looks confusing; if one bows down to the wrong person at the wrong time etc., he goes on to add that the Japanese have a complex stage of bowing down: to whom they bow down, how deep, and for how long. It is difficult to comprehend when two Japanese people meet, bow, and do not understand before one stands straight in front of him. Hold it for a moment without difficulty. Even the slightest difference in position, age, or social status is clearly seen in that moment of separation.

Mike says that there is a clear distinction between positions and basic rules in the family. The wife bowed down to her husband, the child bowed to her father, the younger ones bowed down to the older ones and the sister bowed down to all her brothers. So, bowing to Japan is a natural process while it is unusual and confusing for the author.

2. Do you think the author is finding fault with / making fun of the culture of bowing in Japanese and speeding cars in Brazil?

No, the author does not find fault and does not laugh at any culture. Instead he presents his experience in a humorous way. As a foreigner from Europe on his way to Japan, the intricate customs and greetings of Japanese puzzled him. Looking closely he observes, “Bowing down is no more foolish than shaking hands or kissing on the cheek, but it is more elaborate, more oriental in the east; it is contagious. ” The author is amazed when he sees the Japanese following the clergy class in full submission; young for adults and women for men.

Even the deer was seen bowing to the author in the park. Surprisingly, the author also expressed his disbelief when he saw the bowing gentlemen turn into mobs as soon as the bus arrived. Therefore, the author gives us a real picture of some unusual practices in a particular culture. Writing about Brazilian aspirations for cars and speed he says cars are very expensive in Brazil, but the number of cars is growing exponentially. The driver considers pedestrians to be a good sport while jumping, jumping and running his favorite life. The author finds the fight between the driver and the pedestrian loving. The author finds all these weird but funny.

japan and brazil through a traveler's eye
japan and brazil through a traveler’s eye

Most frequently asked question

( japan and brazil through a traveler’s eye )

1. ‘People who are extremely well behaved’ are referred to

Answers:  Japanese

2. What is the behavior instead of privacy in Japan?

Answer: Respectfully

3. The public telephone reference suggests:

Answers:  How overcrowded Japan is.

4. To govern the requirements of bowing

a. Young people bow down to their elders.

b. The wife bowed down to her husband

c. His sisters bowed down to their brothers

Answers: All of the above

5. What does a person show as a sign of appreciation when eating soup?

Answers:  person makes a horrible noise while eating soup.

Conclusion

In this blog we discuss about japan and brazil through a traveler’s eye George Mikes is a Hungarian painter, writer, publisher, illustrator, and journalist. These quotes are taken from ‘The Land of the rising Yen’ and ‘How the Tango’. Here he writes about his traveling experiences from two different parts of the world, Japan and Brazil.

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japan and brazil through a traveler’s eye

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